Jump to content


Photo

Life Status

srs getablog

  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#31 E. Randy Dupre

E. Randy Dupre

    Just as you suspected, everything I have told you is gibberish

  • Admin
  • 8,856 posts
  • Steam Profile

Posted 21 September 2017 - 11:37 PM

Things changed. The colleague who was in the pool with me for the remaining job decided that she wanted out and that left me unsure as to the best course of action: taking the opportunity to get the redundancy payment and find something else, but potentially leaving myself unemployed long-term again, or taking the job and potentially hating it. In the end, I took the job. The restructure/redundancy meetings at least gave me the opportunity to finally make my feelings clear on where the organisation has been going wrong for years, without fear of a bollocking, because the transfer of the business meant that the senior managers in the meetings with me were all from the company we'd merged with, so they didn't have the baggage and preconceptions regarding me that others from within my own organisation might have had. The contract is worse, in important ways, than the one I was on previously, but I managed to argue them into giving me a pay rise, which counteracts the stuff I've lost.

I still don't know whether taking the job was a mistake or not, tbh. I've effectively ended up with a weird (minor) promotion, thanks to the pay rise and the change to my job description, plus the fact that I'm the only person left within our bit of the company that has a proper understanding of the funding rules that we operate under, the rules relating to our data submissions, etc., I feel like I've got a small element of... I don't know, authority, maybe... due to having that knowledge and being kind of unshackled from direct line management. So that's good and, hopefully, might stand me in good stead for future job applications.

 

On the other hand, there hasn't been a single day since taking the job when I've not ended up feeling irritated, frustrated or angry due to the shit that's getting sent through to me. I guess that's a result of being in an even smaller team now - when there were six of us, if one person found themselves becoming pissed off by the stupidity on show elsewhere, somebody else within the team would inevitably make a daft joke a couple of minutes later and pull that one person out of their anger. Now that there's just three of us, that's proving more difficult, especially given that the other two guys who are left are both much quieter personalities that the three who've gone.

Put it this way: the plan is to use the next ten months, before the negative changes to my contract come into play, to gain a bit more knowledge and experience, while also looking for something else. The pay rise doesn't make up for how wound up I'm getting a lot of the time, due to the general crapitude of the stuff being thrown in my direction. But I'm getting paid every month, I still like immediate team that I'm in and I'm kind of enjoying the fact the senior managers' clear need for me to stay means that I can speak my mind a bit more and try to effect some of the changes that I think the place needs myself.



#32 MrToad

MrToad

    Barcode Battler

  • Full member
  • 1,592 posts

Posted 28 September 2017 - 03:33 PM

Sounds like you've done pretty well out of what was looking to be a really crap situation - well done! And it sounds like you've got a plan to change and hopefully improve things too :)

Things here have stabilised and become, well, boring. The new owners have indeed so far been benevolent. The former (self titled) "Vice-President" was kicked out, which is a good thing as tbh he caused a large portion of the company's problems. The sales team are getting a bit of attention too I think... maybe. To be quite honest there isn't really much else different. The COO and his immediate management (I use the word loosely) team are still the same and still just as ineffectual. In fact that's the big problem: bugger all happens.

I'm in the customer support team, which puts us at the "coal face" where we are most aware of and directly influenced by all the problems with internal processes (or lack of them). But of course all our attempts to point out glaring faults and suggest corrections fall on deaf ears or into the void of no response. Nothing happens, and nothing we say makes any difference, or at least that's how it feels.

It also doesn't help that at the moment I've got bugger all to do. All I'm getting at the moment is a few odd jobs coming through because no-one else wants to do them.

I could rant on for quite a long time, but the basic fact is I need to change my circumstances... but I've no idea what the heck I even want to do or what I can do/apply for with the odd collection of IT-related skills I've got. I'm a jack of all trades odd job problem solver and from what I've seen everyone wants a technical specialist, with lots of specialist experience. Maybe I'm just looking in the wrong places or aiming too high.

#33 E. Randy Dupre

E. Randy Dupre

    Just as you suspected, everything I have told you is gibberish

  • Admin
  • 8,856 posts
  • Steam Profile

Posted 10 October 2017 - 12:10 PM

Sounds very similar to how I feel about my prospects, dude. Enough knowledge of lots of different things to be able to come up with solutions to most problems in ways that most others wouldn't think of, but completely lacking any one area of focus that you can point to as being your area of expertise, or identify as your USP when trying to sell yourself to other companies.






1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users